The AUS job- Part 5

The summer of ‘12
After all the negotiation work had been done, it was time to be an accountant! I was tasked with rebuilding AUS financial history for the last 4 years using the boxes of documents and receipts left over. It is safe to say that I spent most of my summer in the AUS office, with over 12-14 hours per day easily going into organizing the documents left over from the previous years. After I had organized the receipts, cheque requisition forms, deposit slips and all other transaction records in chronological order, I had to go through them again, one-by-one, to enter them into Quickbooks, our accounting software.

After that had been done, I had to go through the bank statements for four years, month-by-month, and reconcile our Quickbooks accounting records item-by-item with the bank statements. One of my motivating factors while working through this was the incredible insight I got into AUS operations by going so thoroughly through the financial records. You cannot get to know an organization better after you have been through each dollar of cash coming in and going out for the last four years three times over.

One of my other motivating factors was to have everything perfectly organized in the way I wanted. There is something beautiful in organizing things, giving structure to what was before an ungodly mess. Organizing these documents and databases was like running a marathon, or solving a very large puzzle. Completing it is its own reward, in addition to any other positive ramifications that may be obtained.

Externalized Departments
The records I had available were for all the non-externalized departments, i.e. departments which did not have their own bank accounts. Records for externalized departments were incredibly irksome to obtain. None of the departmental executives were in Montreal over the summer and the banks wouldn’t release their information to me as I did not have signing authority on their accounts. Many of their records were locked up in their offices for the summer, their bank statements were impossible to obtain, and I could not get the NTRs processed without these documents.

Getting these documents delayed the process. I had to send frantic emails to account managers at the bank, departmental executives (both old and new) and our accountants to coordinate the whole thing, so that we didn’t miss any of our debt repayment deadlines.

In the end, I managed to gain access to these locked up documents by talking to the building manager where the departmental offices were located, and by talking to the account managers at the bank to obtain the bank statements for these accounts. As they can only allow access to these documents/ offices to the specific departmental executives, what they did wasn’t technically legal, but it helped save the AUS.

Delivery!
Once I had all the information compiled, organized and reconciled on both our accounting software and on paper, I delivered it to our accountants. We subsequently had the NTRs made and delivered to McGill on time and got our student fees released.

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